Pillivuyt 200 Years Celebration Jubilee

September 30, 2018


Advertisement // Sponsored post in collaboration with PillivuytA few months ago, I was lucky to visit the place where the Pillivuyt Porcelain is being produced today , in the beautiful town Mehun-sur-Yèvre near Bourges. The team treated us ( we were a full group of Scandinavian bloggers) to a very special weekend due to the occasion of Pillivuyts 200 years Jubilee. We toured Mehun-sur-Yèvre, walked through the streets of Bourges nearby, learned the history of Pillivuyt, visited the factory and talked to the people that work there creating every beautiful piece, before we headed back to Paris for an amazing night. Today I will take you with me in that tour, and I hope at the end, you will not only fall in love with Pillivuyt, but also with its people and their passion for this porcelain that has been in thousands of peoples houses for 200 hundred years now.

But first, let me introduce you to Pillivuyt. In 1818, a young Swiss man, Jean Louis Richard Pillivuyt, bought an old brick factory in the heart of France in a village near the Sancerre wine area.Together with his son Charles Pillivuyt, they created history. Jean Louis Richard had great plans when he took over the old brick factory in the village of Foëcy. Instead of producing brick, he wished to produce porcelain for the French kitchen and the better bourgeoisie.

Porcelain preparation was an advanced process, but the factory’s unique location provided the best prerequisites for producing porcelain of a very special quality. The tree for heating the furnaces found them in the forests of the Sologne region, which were close by. The many rivers and canals in Sancerre gave water to production and were important transport routes. Bergarten kaolin was also easy to get hold of and this is the main ingredient in porcelain. Jean Louis encountered some tough start years and already in 1823 Pillivuyt won his first design award in New York. In 1830, when his eldest son Charles became 20 years old, he became a co-owner of the porcelain factory. In 1854 Charles Pillivuyt started a new factory in Mehun-sur-Yèvre, a village 5 km from Foëcy, next to the Canal de Berry. Here is the Pillivuyt factory today.

Mehun-sur-Yèvre a village close to Bourges share much in common. One of the first things that pop is the architecture , the inviting atmosphere and the welcoming people. The city has a long tradition of art and history. Apart from the cathedral, other sites of importance include the 15th-century Palace of Jacques Cœur and a sixty-five-hectare district of half-timbered houses and fine town-houses. You can walk around easily in the center and never get bored of the sights, the houses, the feeling of walking in a mid century french town. I highly recommend it.

After a day of enjoying Bourges, Pillivuyt wanted us to not only have a good time, but appreciate what gives Pillivuyt its unique profile. What makes it so special that it has lasted for 200 years and as it stands, easily 100 more? Pillivuyt has character and not just because it looks beautiful and undeniable quality. There is deeply rooted within its concept the French attitude, from good food to great presentation, to everything that involves setting a spectacular dinner that you enjoy with wine even in an everyday basis. The inspiration comes from Frances old castles, the luxury and uniqueness of its cuisine, the vast knowledge of fine wine and dinning. What better place to find that out but the phenomenal Hôtel de Panette, where we were treated with wine tasting and local delicacies while we enjoyed a relaxing afternoon. Just by looking at the photos of Hôtel de Panette (photo above and below), you can see what I mean, if that is not the embodiment of French luxury, I am not sure what else will best describe it. It is also now I think quite clear where Pillivuyt is coming from, and where it gets not only its inspiration but also its history.

The next day , we finally headed for Mehun-sur-Yèvre, where Pillivuyt is being produced today in its entirety. From the very beginning, it has always been Pillivuyts philosophy to create beautiful and durable porcelain.A craft that meets the high quality standards that both professional cooks and private food lovers have in the kitchen and around the dining table.

It has made Pillivuyt the porcelain of a very special casting. Porcelain created in collaboration with the best and most passionate cooks in their subjects. Porcelain that meets the highest standards of functionality, durability and design. Porcelain sets are made of field patches with a high content of feldspar and quartz. It’s the factory’s unique porcelain pulp which, together with an extremely hard glaze, makes the porcelain extra resistant to impact and impact. All the porcelain from Pillivuyt has its own stamp at the bottom, this is the factory’s quality assurance and your guarantee that porcelain meets the quality requirements that Pillivuyt has set for generations.

While taking the tour of the factory, we were lucky to not only learn about the process and the history (both photos above from their archived designs,molds on the shelfs as well as originals that are not produced or never have been produced, or where only produced once for a special occasion) but also see it step by step. Every piece of porcelain you own from Pillivuyt you should know is made by hand, almost 100%. From the cast, to treatment, the only process that is automated is transport, some washing stages and of course burning. However even the smallest piece, from a cup to a handle, everything is handmade, hand colored, and treated with care and the outmost respect. An important detail to know that I think makes the whole process even more special. The molds are not permanent, as they will suffer from use. If I am not mistaken no more than 50 pieces can be made from a single mold before even the mold needs to be made anew. The mold is also handmade!

Before the porcelain from Pillivuyt lands in your kitchen and is set on the table, it has been through a long process. It has been treated, designed and burned with a dedication, precision and love to give you the strongest and best porcelain.Pillivuyts porcelain pulp contains, among other things, raw materials such as kaolin, clay, silicon soil, feldspar, alumina and quartz, which are made on secret recipes.The production is based on the fact that the porcelain mass is processed and filtered in heavy machinery, where impurities are sown and most of the water. 

First burning lasts approx. 16 hours and takes place at 1000 oC. Other shipment lasts between 19 and 27 hours at up to 1,400 oC. The high heat makes it possible to achieve white, glossy and impure products of perfect quality. The burning at the high temperatures is essential for porcelain strength and the furnaces are together with the porcelain mixture, a vital part of the production. The latest and most modern furnaces were built and installed in 2003, but several of the furnaces have been active since the beginning.At the factory in Mehun-sur-Yèvre, 22,500 pieces of porcelain are burned daily.

One of my favorite processes, the soft clay and kaolin that is molded then the scraps or any misshapen pieces are gathered so they can be reduced, recycled and reused!

After the porcelain is cast and molded, there is the stage where the pieces are still soft, not having been burned neither glazed yet, they gather on shelves ready to be taken in the furnaces and finishing touches. The raw materials show, the rough surfaces even though cannot be used for service, they seem like work of art waiting to be displayed to a gallery.

One of the examples of this in between stage that I love so much,  can be seen above, handled with care by the expert worker. Pillivuyt has very strict guidelines when it comes to size and imperfections. Even though every single piece is hand made, it is very important to them that they look as identical as possible. Even a millimeter of misshape will lead to the piece to be discarded in the recycle bin, while smaller mistakes will make it to their outlet. Only the pieces that make it through strict quality control are sold in the stores, an impressive achievement and a testimony to the passion and integrity Pillivuyt has always displayed for 200 years. It was one of those recycle bins I almost dived in to find some pieces that I wanted to bring home (after politely asking since this is still material that will be reused therefore equally valuable), and by chance I found the photos of its preparation. You can see one of the pieces that made it home with me below where I use it as a vase and storage. It is very soft, though it keeps its shape perfectly, but it feels almost like chalk, I also treat with with love and care and it is the perfect reminder of my visit to the Pillivuyt factory!

The outlet ( as seen in the photo above), can only be found in the factory premises, but if you happen to be in Paris, it is really worth a visit, it is barely 2 hours away by train and it can always be combined with a tour of Bourges as well!

What is my favorite design from Pillivuyt ?A few months ago I made a table styling for Pillivuyt , you can see it here, where clearly you can see that my favorite is the Plisse line.  However , when it comes to Pillivuyt, it is really hard to chose one as a favorite. Toulouse is a series that is great for baking and serving, and I always end up combining those two.

// Photography and Editing by Katerina Dima – Last photo courtesy of Pillivuyt

 

 

 Find me on Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter | Facebook | Bloglovin | Feedly | Snapchat | Etsy

© 2013-2018 ONLYDECOLOVE.COM

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The post :Pillivuyt 200 Years Celebration Jubilee  , appeared first on Only Deco Love 


A peek into the Fredericia World

November 12, 2017


//Trip and expenses were sponsored by Georg Jensen and Fredericia.

A little while ago I and a few other colleagues had the chance to visit the Fredericia showroom in Copenhagen, learn more about the history and designs of Fredericia Furniture but also, enjoy a full day of an amazing tour, part of the Scandi design Tour 2017 organized by Fredericia and Georg Jensen. I have already written about the day we spend at Georg Jensen at my Inside Georg Jensen : The making of the Torun Bangle post, for a full tour you are welcomed to read both!


Starting our tour we left hotel SP34 and walked towards the Fredericia Showroom in a beautiful sunny day in Copenhagen. The new Showroom at the top of the historic former Royal Mail House was renovated and restored to display the entire collection of Fredericia designs, a creative workspace and a gallery with changing exhibitions. We met with Thomas and Rasmus Graversen (2nd and 3nd generation owners of the company) on the first floor of the showroom, where first we were introduced to some iconic classic designs, like the Spanish chair, the Trinidad chair , the 2213 sofa and the Søborg Chair . Fredericia is also proud of collaborations with a carefully chosen circle of international designers, all renown for their exceptional level of design integrity. All with the ambition of creating contemporary design that is always beautifully crafted, relevant and aesthetically intriguing. Already iconic examples include the Swoon chair ( as seen above in the Space Copenhagen offices) and the Spine Collection from Space Copenhagen.

The Hunting Chair, as seen below, designed by Børge Mogensen in 1950, was Mogensen’s first work with exposed wooden framing and saddle leather. The chair in the Fredericia showroom is the very first working prototype, we were lucky that the showroom was exhibitioning such rare iconic furniture. With the Spanish Chair Mogensen expanded upon his work with solid oak and saddle leather. The chair was launched in 1958 as part of an innovative living space exhibition, in which all tables were removed from the floor to create an open living space. Fredericia has its roots in traditional craftsmanship based on a deep understanding of natural materials like vegetable tanned leather and solid wood. Solid pieces of oak from sustainable European forests are refined and processed; creating the elegant frame for the iconic Spanish Chair. Each part of the timber frame for the Spanish Chair is assembled with wooden dowels and bonded together under high pressure to ensure strength and stability for decades to come. It takes a steady hand to colour the leather edges of the Spanish Chair and continuing our tour in the Fredericia showroom we were treated to a craftmanship class by one of the craftsmen from Tränsjo Garveri , who showed us parts of the process.The entire production requires fourteen days of patient craftsmanship and passionate dedication to complete the iconic Spanish Chair. You can see the Spanish chair in the making in a video at Fredericia website here and gain even more insight in the design and the process. Below you can see some photos from the process captured by me, and then the Spanish chair displayed in the beautiful rooftop part of the showroom on the top floor where at the evening we were treated to an exquisite dinner and cocktails. 


We were lucky to be able to experience prototypes in our tour, the 2213 sofa as seen above Mogensen designed for his own home in 1962, and it is that very one that is displayed here. With generous proportions, modest aesthetic, a choice of materials and execution second to none, the sofa achieves Mogensen’s ambition to create the ultimate sofa. From the solid hardwood frame construction, to the carefully measured ratio of foam to feather in the cushions, the sofa part of the collection is thoroughly uncompromising. The bull hides used at Fredericia are of the highest calibre, from animals that have been raised under strict ethical guidelines. Every sofa and chair in the collection is 100% hand crafted and upholstered in the Fredericia factory in Denmark.






Even though I visit Copenhagen a lot these days for work, I was still very happy that the team had arranged for us to have lunch at a cafe a short walk by, that serves something all Danish people enjoy for lunch everyday, the unique smørrebrød (literally spread bread, or open faced sandwich). Invariably based on rye bread, smørrebrød can have an almost limitless number of different toppings, from herring, to raw beef, seafood and egg, and it is delicious, you can take my word for it.




After lunch, taking advantage of the beautiful weather we walked towards Space Copenhagen offices, where the talented architects ( and designers) duo Peter Bundgaard Rützou ( above ) and Signe Bindslev Henriksen ( below), talked to us about the design process from concept to prototype to production of few of their iconic designs for Fredericia, the Swoon chair and Spine Collection.


Space Copenhagen originally designed Spine for the interior design for a Michelin starred restaurant in 2011. The Spine series has a solid character where the texture of the wood and upholstery are given solid emphasis. The hand-sewn upholstery for the chair is inspired by techniques that were developed at Fredericia’s workshop for Børge Mogensen’s exclusive 1960’s leather series. Spine is a fusion of the organic, solid, and modern. In designing the series, Space Copenhagen felt their way forward using their intuition, until reaching a balanced design that invites many hours of relaxation. The Swoon was designed to fill the gap between a conventional lounge chair and a typical armchair – for use in lounge areas as well as private homes. The organic, yet structured design holds the seated body and provides an instant feeling of relaxation while offering excellent back support.



After our visit to Space Copenhagen, it was time to return to SP34 for a quick rest, then head back to Fredericia Showroom for a beautiful dinner on the rooftop. I dont have photos from the dinner but, the table was set with Georg Jensen tableware while we seated in an array of all Fredericia chairs, iconic classics and new favorites. At the end of the night we moved outside on the balcony to learn how to make our own cocktails using the new Georg Jensen Sky bar collection. All that with an exquisite view of Copenhagen from above. 


I want to thank the Fredericia and Georg Jensen team for organising the Scandi design Tour 2017showing us around Copenhagen. It was a fascinating two days where not only I got to be with fellow colleagues, but all of us got a chance to learn the history and appreciate even more these iconic Danish brands. 


I hope everyone enjoyed these series of posts as much as I enjoyed taking photos during the tour!





// Photography by Katerina Dima


Find me on Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter | Facebook | Bloglovin | Feedly | Snapchat | Etsy

© 2013-2017 ONLYDECOLOVE.COM

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


The post : A peek into Fredericia world , appeared first on Only Deco Love

Styling and photography by Katerina Dima unless otherwise stated.


Inside Georg Jensen : The making of the Torun Bangle

October 28, 2017


//Trip and expenses were sponsored by Georg Jensen and Fredericia.

Two thousand seventeen, marks the 50th year of the collaboration between Georg Jensen and master Silversmith Vivianna Torun Bülow-Hübe, and a propos this celebration, a few blogger colleagues and me had the opportunity to be invited to Copenhagen and see first hand the making of the her famous Torun bangle, as well as, an inside exclusive view of the world of Georg Jensen

With a history that spans more than 100 years, Georg Jensen represents quality craftsmanship and timeless aesthetic design, producing lifestyle products ranging from hollowware to watches, jewellery and home products. The philosophy of Georg Jensen himself was to create democratic designs possessing both functionality and beauty. His artisanal skill and artistic talent combined with his continuous ability to identify and support design talent was the foundation on which he built Georg Jensen in Copenhagen in 1904. 

Georg Jensen’s style embraced the Art Nouveau lines of the day but injected them with a distinctive vigour that continues to resonate today. Serene flowing forms are enriched by exquisitely sculpted ornamentation and his stylised bouquets of flowers and lush bunches of grapes reflect his sensual delight in nature.


We were treated to a tour of the Silver Smithy, where we got to see how some of the designs were being realized almost from start to finish in various stages. From mold to form, even prototypes had so much elegance and uniqueness that they could easily be treated as art pieces of great value. I was fascinated not only by the history of the designs, the designers themselves, but also by the silversmiths and their dedication to the craftsmanship. Twenty seven silversmiths currently work at the intimate Georg Jensen smithy, each with a special set of skills. Each item produced here is 100% handmade, formed and expertly hammered into shape. From apprentice to silversmith, one needs 4 years of practice before they are able to work on their own without guidance, but becoming a master is a lifetime work. The pieces themselves take exceptionally long to make, a pitcher can take up to two months, while one of their most famous pieces Hennings Koppel Fish Dish takes more than 6 months of work. Every single piece produced at the smithy is a work of art, from jewelry to cutlery, truly the work of masters.


During our tour we not only got to visit the silver smithy, but we were lucky to be able to get an exclusive look into the archives of Georg Jensen filled with hundreds of original designs some more than 100 years old, as well as the design lab which was filled with sketches and prototypes ( some of which I am not allowed to share with you yet! ). We were also lucky to talk to the designer Aurélien Barbry of the new collection Sky, and discuss about the functionality of his designs as well as the creative process. 


The highlight of the tour however for me was getting to know more about the designer Vivianna Torun Bülow-Hübe, and watch as various expert silversmiths realised in front of our eyes one of her designs, the Torun bangle.


Vivianna Torun Bülow-Hübe (1927 – 2004) was born in Malmö Sweden. She graduated from the Academy of Industrial Arts in Stockholm in 1945 and in 1956 she settled in Paris where she quickly became known for her jewellery. Torun’s designs have become legendary and are exhibited at several museums worldwide including the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Torun was philosophical about the role of design in our everyday lives:

“A piece of jewellery should be a symbol of love. It should enhance and move with the body so that it blends with you. It must not overwhelm, but enhance you. This is why it must be timeless. It shouldn’t matter if you are 17 or 87 years old.”

Torun was an exceptionally talented artist, her pieces were all formed by bending silver into the forms she imagined using only one piece of metal. The Torun bangle folds around the wrist gracefully and it locks in a way that symbolizes the bond that two people have together, stronger in unison than being apart. Symbolism was very important to Torun and all her pieces have greater meaning. She was so connected with her ideas that she even reinvented them over time, nothing was forgotten and everything was in a constant flux in her creative process.


In the Georg Jensen smithy there is a recreation of Toruns own workshop, borrowing clothes and memorabilia, books and items that she treasured, here time almost stops and one can dive into Toruns world. A fierce feminist Torun was the voice of liberation in all fronts, social , sexual, racial, cultural, she did not conform to the tropes of her time. She began making jewelry as a teenager and she even staged her first exhibition at the age of 21. In 1948 she traveled to Paris and Cannes, where she met painters Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Henri Matisse.


Torun’s jewelry was inspired by natural shapes such as flowers, leaves, swirls and the flow of water. It is described as sober, minimalist and simple. Torun has been praised for her ability to shape solid materials into seemingly flexible forms, so that metal flows like water around the wearer’s neck and shoulders.She did not use valuable stones, preferring instead pebbles, granite, rock crystal, moonstone and quartz.

In 1948, saying that she didn’t want to design jewelry for the wives of wealthy men to keep locked up in private, Torun began making what she called “anti-status jewelry” out of twisted silver wire embellished with crystals and stones. In 1959, she designed the Mobius necklace, which included a lead crystal drop to be draped over the shoulder of the wearer. It was described by Barbara Cartlidge, author of the reference book Twentieth Century Jewelry, as a “milestone in the history of modern jewelry.” In 1962, Torun designed a stainless steel bangle-style wristwatch for an exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris.It later became the first wristwatch to be produced by the world-renowned Danish silver company Georg Jensen.


The Torun bangle takes an expert silversmith more than 10 hours of work to make. It goes through various stages of process, the strand of silver is cut with a saw to an appropriate size, then filled from all sides, then following the steps of the designer herself, folded manually into its final shape. The process looks simple when you look at it from afar, but we had a chance to be involved into all the steps and I cannot stress this enough, there was nothing easy or simple when your hands are doing the work. It is no wonder takes patience and expertise that can only be gained after years of honing the procedure. The final result , the Torun bangle looks effortless, and it naturally folds over the wrist, just as Vivianna Torun herself intended. 


Even though we didnt get to make our own Torun Bangle however ( despite our best efforts ), we were each gifted with one that was custom made for us, down to our carved initials on the inside. I would have treasured this gift regardless for years, but it was extra special for me after learning so much about Torun, getting involved in the whole process and being part of this amazing experience. A big thank you to Georg Jensen and our hosts for organizing one of the most beautiful trip.  

// Photography and Styling by Katerina Dima


Find me on Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter | Facebook | Bloglovin | Feedly | Snapchat | Etsy

© 2013-2017 ONLYDECOLOVE.COM

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


The post : Inside Georg Jensen : The making of the Torun Bangle  , appeared first on Only Deco Love

Styling and photography by Katerina Dima unless otherwise stated.


Bolon | Innovators at Heart

July 5, 2017


//Sponsored post in collaboration with Bolon

Those who follow me on instagram a few weeks ago got treated with some sneak peeks from the opening of the Bolon Lab Store in Stockholm. Together with Elisabeth Heier (find her post about Bolon here but also a few highlights of what we got up to those 24 hours here), we met up with Susanna Vento and Therese Sennerholt and the rest of the Bolon team for a delicious family breakfast at the Bolon Lab Store, where we found out more about Bolon and its history.


But who is Bolon? I admit I had only known them by name and reputation as the highly renowned Swedish flooring company. What I was delighted to discover was that there is so much more passion , design and most of all innovation involved in the making and running of the company, something that in my opinion is the cornerstone of what defines Bolon and their success. Do read on if you are just as curious!


Bolon started as a labour of love. Founder Nils-Erik Eklund started making rag rugs out of textile waste and to this day Bolon is celebrated for the recycling processes that are the heart of flooring creation. Research and development at Bolon is a holistic affair, with a number of considerations about new products on a project-by-project basis. The recent collections with architect Jean Nouvel ended up as a six final colourways but generated over 150 samples over a two year development. Talented Annica and Marie Eklund ,Nils-Erik grand daughters who took over the family business a few years ago, are now the heart of Bolon, their vision and personality is what drives Bolon forward into an innovative future. They have been on a mission – to make Bolon a design-led innovator and fuse the conservative, traditional flooring branch with the boundless creativity of the world of fashion.In doing so, they’ve collaborated with world-renowned designers and architects as well as working with international brands.


In Projects we Love, Bolon magazine, we can find their most beloved projects intertwined with interviews, beautiful projects and compelling facts about the company as well as Annicas and Maries compelling facts and glimpses into their own lives. The women behind Bolon are fascinating and multi talented (Annica is a remarkable photographer, more of her works can be found at Annica Eklund Studio, as well as many of her published coffee table books with her photos) but at the same time so very approachable. They mention it is part of their upbringing, their house was always open to friends and family, so they are actively nurturing personal and professional relationships with the same passion. It is this humble but powerful attitude that has made collaborations with legendary names such as Jean Nouvel easy as sundays family dinner, and the same goes with Missoni , renowned fashion house. But it is more than an attitude that creates this feeling, Annica and Marie are not just hospitable, they are not just friendly, they believe in a personal touch when it comes to relationships passionately, it is so important to them and Bolon to work with people they have bonded with. Just a few of their clients include Armani, Google, Volvo Cars, Adidas, Skype, Missoni and Rezidor Hotel Group.

For more of their impressive projects, feel free to visit Projects we Love, while their flooring collection can be found at Collections.





The Lab Store is a hub of design where tactile flooring and textile installations serve as a backdrop for a rotating programme  of exhibitions, workshops, lectures and dinners. It is a space for designers, architects and enthusiasts to meet and exchange ideas. Bolon draws on its collaborative approach to design––which includes partnerships with Jean Nouvel, Missoni, Monica Förster, Doshi Levien, Färg & Blanche, Cappellini and more––to promote creative discourse around its architectural ooring. The Lab Store will provide a new forum in which to meet, enjoy a meal or coffee prepared by an in-house chef, engage in dialogue about ideas and plans, and receive advice and support from Bolon’s flooring experts.

We were also treated to a wonderful breakfast on the day of our meeting with Bolon, and the Lab Store lived up to its expectation magnificently. Everyone, guests, clients, designers, industry leaders, experts and manufacturers are an integral part of Bolon’s DNA, and they are all treated like members of the Bolon family. The in house chef prepared us exquisite breakfast and exceptional coffee and we were more than welcomed later to make ourselves fully at home in the Bolon world and interact with the exhibitions on display. 

We were also treated to some exciting news , Bolons first rug collection which we were allowed to see some sneak peeks. It marks the debut of Bolon’s new direction toward interior design with its collection of rugs. In alternating stripes in muted tones with a subtle shimmer, the rugs are the result of an experiment to combine glitter thread and wool to achieve a tactile effect characteristic of Bolon’s unique refined look and durable quality. Its colour and material palette – the result of an extensive research and development process – take inspiration from the deep jewel tones and moody neutrals of fashion textiles.


As a final note, I would like to thank Bolon for inviting me to experience the opening of The Lab Store, but mostly, for making me feel part of the Bolon family. It is this very magical touch that nurtures all their relationships and propels Bolon into the future. I cannot wait for what comes next for Bolon, keep an eye on the blog for future news.

//Photos 3-11 and 15,16,17,18 via Bolon | Photos 1,2 and 12-14 by Katerina Dima 

Find me on Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter | Facebook | Bloglovin | Feedly | Snapchat | Etsy

© 2013-2017 ONLYDECOLOVE.COM

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


The post : Bolon | Innovators at heart , appeared first on Only Deco Love

Styling and photography by Katerina Dima unless otherwise stated.


Only Deco Love
©
Design by Blog Milk